Darkness, Our Friend

In 2004 I walked through what some people might call a dark night of the soul.

Our family of four returned to California from crushing disappointment in Michigan after a failed business attempt. I struggled to understand.

Was it a mistake? We were sure that God sent us there to embark on new adventure for our family and with Christian friends.

A song by Jeremy Camp came out around that time. The chorus was,

 

I still believe in your holiness. I still believe in your truth. I still believe in your holy Word. Even when don’t see. I still believe.

 

I remember cry-singing these words to God as I lay face down on the cold tile floor in my bathroom. I spoke the words, but my heart felt like the tile under face where my tears gathered.

That failure and discouragement shook my lifelong paradigm that A + B = C. We follow God’s leading he is supposed to prosper us. If we obey, he blesses. That is what the Bible says, isn’t it?

When we returned to the safety of our home state of California, I could not wait to escape that cold, dark place my soul had become. I clamored for the security that is found in the light.

I ran to the safety of what one of my favorite authors, Barbara Brown Taylor calls “solar Christianity”. It is the relentless effort to brighten every dark and scary part of our existence, not permitting any dank corner of doubt or confusion to remain.

The church we ended up in had clearly designated lines of demarcation between light and dark. We implemented formulas that we were told were based on biblical truth. Do “this” and “that” will happen. Believe and speak the truth and all will be well. Tell the devil to flee and he will.

It was just what I craved in those murky days. But in hindsight, I’m not sure it was what I really needed.

When Darkness Remains

Doesn’t biblical truth include not knowing why things happen the way they do? Is there room for confusion and doubt to linger in our hearts instead of rushing them out the door? Does darkness have something to teach us if we would just let it sit and stay for a while?

The disciples that followed and loved Jesus could not comprehend that the ministry of their Teacher included the darkest day in history, where he was violently beaten and then crucified. They believed he came to save the world, but they were unable to see how the night of his death could be a part of that plan of salvation.

The glory of light is only appreciated after the darkness of night. Even as morning dawned on Resurrection Sunday to find Jesus had conquered the darkness of Good Friday, some of the nighttime remained. His closest friends saw him and touched him, but still did not comprehend his purpose.

Jesus chose not to speed them through their confusion and disappointment just because they were uncomfortable. But when the time was right many weeks later in that upper room in Jerusalem, the first of countless hearts were illuminated by the Holy Spirit who Jesus promised would guide his followers into the truth and reveal God’s mysteries.

We think of night and darkness as sinister and creepy. We fear what can happen in places where we have no idea what is around the next corner or even hiding right beside us. When we find ourselves in those places, we eagerly, sometimes frantically, plead for dawn or strain to see the light at the end of the tunnel so that we can escape.

But darkness existed before light did. Not only that, God chose not to eliminate the darkness altogether when he created the world. All he did was separated it from the light. (Genesis 1:2-5)

Why is that? Could it be that the dark periods in our lives, the times of confusion and disappointment, are just as necessary for our growth and eternal well-being as the times when all is bright? Isn’t it in the darkness that our senses are heightened and more attuned?

Seeing the Unseen

I rise early every morning, around five o’clock most days. I hear Georgia the cat meowing at my door hoping I will play fetch with her. It is dark at that hour no matter the season, but it is my favorite time of day.

Getting out of bed I do not turn on the light. I sit up, feel for my glasses and my phone on the side table. I reach out for my glass of water, hoping not to knock it over. That kind of fumble would force me to switch on the lamp to assess the damage and clean up, effectively ending my husband’s peaceful rest.

My sense of touch, hearing and even sight are leveraged as I strain to see what I cannot see, listen for signs of undisturbed sleep from my husband as I feel my way to the door.

If we are wise, we will similarly engage our spiritual senses during times in our lives when we do not understand what in the world God is doing. Normally, we turn on the light as soon as we can find it. But if we will allow the darkness to stay a while, we might find just what we need, even if it is not what we expect.

God does not promise that we will find the answers we seek while we are enveloped by the night seasons in our lives. We will bump into things and cause spills that need to be sopped up. But he tells us that we can find something much more satisfying. Jeremiah 29:11 is one of the most comforting scriptures in the Bible.

 “For I know the plans I have for you, declares the LORD, plans for welfare and not for evil, to give you a future and a hope.”

Two verses later in Jeremiah 29:13 we read,

“You will seek me and find me, when you seek me with all your heart.”

If we will pray and seek him In the dark times of our lives, we will not necessarily find straightforward answers, but we will find him. And when we find him, the longing for answers fades as we are enveloped in the light of the presence of him who is the Way, the Truth and the Life.

The Promise of Everlasting Light

That’s what happened to the disciples. As they waited and prayed through their spiritual darkness, they were visited by tongues of fire resting on each of them. (Acts 2:1- 3) The Spirit of Light came to live in and with them, illuminating what was most important, transforming them into light bearers for our spiritually darkened world.

They finally had clarity about what God’s plan was, even if they did not have answers to every question and solutions to every problem.

The Lord did not eliminate all darkness from believers at Pentecost and he leaves us marinating in ours sometimes as well. He finds our uncertainty, and even our suffering, useful for reasons we may never fully understand.

But he promises that one day, when he has completed all he has planned for the earth, he will eradicate the night, and everything will be illuminated. He will be our Light and the only one we need.

And night will be no more. They will need no light of lamp or sun, for the Lord God will be their light, and they will reign forever and ever”.

Revelation 22:5

Until that day, there are lessons to be learned as we grope and stumble in the night hours of our pilgrimage on earth.

If I say, “Surely the darkness will hide me, and the light become night around me” – even the darkness is not dark to You, but the night shines like the day, for darkness is as light to You.

Psalm 139:11-12

So, we can walk on, even in the dark night of the soul, seeking to find and to know our loving God more deeply. To him our night is as bright as the day and he will guide us home.

 

3 Reasons I Cannot Support Black Lives Matter

Our country is in another season of turmoil over race relations. More black men have died this year in circumstances which many say are directly related to race because the men who killed the black men were white. Those deaths are under investigation as I write. It is a trying time of hurt, anger, confusion and conflict.

Subsequently, the organization called Black Lives Matter, founded in 2013, has called their supporters to speak out. Many people have protested peacefully against what they see as ongoing racial discrimination against blacks by police and by the entire country from top to bottom. They call it systemic racism.

Sadly, some of the people who are protesting against racial discrimination have resorted to violence against the police, defacing buildings and looting. They are tearing down public statues, even those that are not linked to the Confederacy, such as Ulysses S. Grant and St. Junipero Serra in San Francisco.

Protesting is good and necessary at times. But violence, hatred against police, theft and vandalism never is. Unfortunately, those who are committing these crimes do so in the name of the Black Lives Matter movement and they have not condemned it.

Many in the black community and their supporters from other communities are angry that not everyone is joining in the protests or at least publicly lending their support to Black Lives Matter. The Christian community is especially pressured to come out in vocal support.

As a Christian, I cannot support Black Lives Matter and I will tell you a few reasons why.

Before I list my reasons, I want to be clear. Just because I am not supporting Black Lives Matter the organization, doesn’t mean I do not care about injustice or oppression.

Righteousness and justice are the foundation of God’s throne and he cares especially for those who are oppressed and unfairly treated. Therefore, every Christian should care about those things as well, and voice them, publicly or not.

Not only that, Christians should care about everything that the Bible says and that’s why I don’t support BLM. It’s simply because the organization espouses beliefs I can’t support even though I care deeply about black lives.

But like many of you, I don’t align myself with any organization that is fundamentally against my beliefs. That’s the freedom we all have and thank God we still do. We can choose whom to link arms with.

3 Reasons I Cannot Support Black Lives Matter

I appreciate how clearly BLM has laid out their beliefs on their website. It sounds like they want to fundamentally change the structure of society as much as possible. Here are just a couple of the several beliefs I cannot support, and which are fundamentally anti-Christian (I’m assuming an adherence to the Bible when I say Christian):

  1. I believe wholeheartedly in the nuclear family as the foundation of a healthy society. However, Black Lives Matter believes:

“We disrupt the Western-prescribed nuclear family structure requirement by supporting each other as extended families and “villages” that collectively care for one another, especially our children…”

  1. I hold to the normalcy and health of heterosexuality, but I respect everyone’s personal lifestyle and sexual orientation as belonging to them and none of my business. However, Black Lives Matter believes:

“We foster a queer‐affirming network. When we gather, we do so with the intention of freeing ourselves from the tight grip of heteronormative thinking…”

  1. According to one of its co-founders, Patrisse Cullors, BLM is a spiritual movement, with religious rituals and deities. In an article in support of Black Lives Matter written by Hebah Farrag on Georgetown University website, she outlines the religious aspects of the movement very well. She writes:

“The movement infuses a syncretic blend of African and indigenous cultures’ spiritual practices and beliefs, embracing ancestor worship; Ifa-based ritual such as chanting, dancing, and summoning deities; and healing practices such as acupuncture, reiki, therapeutic massage, and plant medicine in much of its work, including protest. That work, though, often remains invisible.”

Since Black Lives Matter the organization has a religious aspect with other gods besides Jesus, and some practices that I believe are occult practices, I won’t align myself with them. Not with a good conscience before my Lord.

But I don’t condemn those who support Black Lives Matter. That’s not my job or my heart.

I love and support all people of color wholeheartedly, and I long for the beautiful day that the Lord Jesus comes to bring true and complete justice and peace to our wonderful, colorful world. He’s the only One who can.